Media

Media Policy

The Brunswick Judicial Circuit District Attorney aims to scrupulously follow the Georgia Rules of Professional Conduct. The office is not ethically allowed to answer many questions posed by reporters, whatever the journalistic merit. The office cannot, for example, discuss an accused party’s criminal history or speculate about the impact of a particular piece of evidence. These rules are in place to ensure a defendant’s rights to a fair trial and the presumption of innocence until proven guilty.

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I file a Georgia Open Records Act request?
The Georgia Open Records Act governs which records are to be open for public inspection. The law can be viewed by clicking here. To make an open records request, contact our our open records custodian, Cathy Browning, at cbrowning@pacga.org.
How do I request an interview with District Attorney Keith Higgins or another member of the office’s staff?

To make an interview request, please contact our Brunswick office at 912-554-7200 or email Cheryl DiPrizio at cdiprizio@pacga.org

How do I learn more about the District Attorney’s Office’s media policies and rules governing pretrial publicity?
Our office is committed to transparent, open responses to questions from the media. However, prosecutors and members of the District Attorney’s staff have unique legal restrictions on commenting about pending matters. Visit this website to learn more about our media policies.

Open Records Act Request: Pursuant to O.C.G.A. 50-18-71(b)(2), the Open Records Officer for the Brunswick Judicial Circuit District Attorney’s Office is Cathy Browning. Written requests should be submitted to her via email at cbrowning@pacga.org or by mail to the Brunswick Judicial Circuit District Attorney’s Office, Attention: Cathy Browning, 210 E. 4th St., Woodbine, GA 31569.
Media Policy: The Brunswick Judicial Circuit District Attorney aims to scrupulously follow the Georgia Rules of Professional Conduct. The office is not ethically allowed to answer many questions posed by reporters, whatever the journalistic merit. The office cannot, for example, discuss an accused party’s criminal history or speculate about the impact of a particular piece of evidence. These rules are in place to ensure a defendant’s rights to a fair trial and the presumption of innocence until proven guilty.